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Curtis’ Full Time Traveler Gear Guide With Camping Gear

Curtis’ Full Time Traveler Gear Guide With Camping Gear

Jill and I sold pretty much everything we own and are traveling the world full time. Below is a list that represents virtually everything that I travel with. Jill has created her own gear list HERE. Below is just the stuff that I carry.  My full 70L pack weighs about 36 pounds, and my 30L weighs about 17  pounds. When we want to do a multi-day hike, I leave laptops and other things I don’t need in the daypack in hotel storage or with people I know, to save weight.  Traveling as a couple, many of the camping items we share. I own these items and recommend them from personal use. A few of the items I am planning to upgrade to in the near future.  At the moment I am planning to upgrade my 70L pack and water filter.  I also want to downgrade my stove to the twig burning stove shown below, from my current Optimus Nova+ multifuel stove because of issues with bringing the empty fuel bottles through airport security as well as the annoyance of finding fuel and the additional weight.  However, the Optimus stove is probably the best multi-fuel stove I have ever used if you consider the convenience factor on the trail and if you don’t need to fly anywhere.  I am keeping the Optimus stove for camping in the Canadian Rockies, and for camping where regulations do not allow wood burning stoves.

Some of these items I leave in storage with my family because our plans for the year don’t require them. For example as I write this, I am not carrying the cookware set, stove, water filtration system or hiking boots.

Some of the links below are affiliate links so I earn a small commission if you click and buy. It is greatly appreciated if you do! It helps fund what we are doing and encourage us to review more gear.

Backcountry Camping Gear

If I was traveling as a single person, I would delete the tent + pillow + thermarest + cookset, and replace with a Hennessy hammock tent (I have owned and recommend, requires large trees with about 12 ft spacing) and a very small lightweight stainless steel pot or billy can.

pack
70L Pack
Waterproof, 2.2 lbs
daypack
30L Backpack
2.1 lbs Drybag. Also check out my Top 10 Waterproof Daypacks list.
tent
2 person tent
2 person, comes with fly, only 3.3 lbs
pillow
Camp pillow
Compresses small, comfortable, 212g
tarp
Tarp
1 lb. To setup camp in rain, or as groundsheet or tent footprint
cord
Cord
For rain tarp
bed
Thermarest sleeping pad
350g
hydration
Hydration and water storage
3 Liter
bottle
Water bottle
1 Liter
waterfilter
Water filter
Effortless water filter system
gaiters
Gaiters
0.6 lbs. For snowy or muddy treks, or scree skiing
towel
Quick dry towel
mug
Mug
For tea, or make oatmeal in it
stove
Twig burning stove
0.3 lbs. Should have no issue through airport security.
cookset
Cookset
1.3 lbs, For two people
spork
Long spork
Longer length for eating dehydrated meal packets
sleepingbag
Compact sleeping bag
1.4 lbs, compresses down as small as a waterbottle
liner
Bag liner
1 lb, stuffs to 4in x 8in
bracelet
Paracord bracelet
carabiner
Caribiners
headlamp
Headlamp
multitool
Multitool
compass
Compass

 


 

Clothing

The list below is for our regular style of travel, staying in B&B’s or renting places for months at a time. For serious backcountry trips, I travel without jeans, normal shirts or shorts and no swim trunks. Instead, I take one hat, one pair of footwear, 4 changes of clothes with only quickdry shirts and only one pair of hiking pants that convert to shorts.

rainjacket
Weatherproof shell
0.2 lbs, breathable
fleece
Fleece jacket
0.8 lbs, For below freezing weather wear this under the shell
rockgloves
Scrambling gloves
To avoid cuts when scrambling mountains
coldgloves
Cold weather gloves
Mitt end flips for easier camera use
tilleyhat
Adventure hat
ballcap
Ball cap
sunglasses
Polarized sunglasses
hikingpants
Hiking pants
jeans
Jeans
shorts
Shorts
quickdryshirt
Quick Dry T-Shirts (5)
shirt
Normal Shirts (3)
underwear
Undies (6)
socks
Socks (6)
swimshorts
Swim trunks or board shorts
shoe
Trail runners
For everyday use or easy hikes
boots
Hiking boots
For scrambles and wet or cold hikes

 


 

Electronics

For serious backcountry camping trips I do not carry the laptop and accessories. With powerful smart phones and free offline GPS apps such as OsmAnd, there is also no need for a car GPS. For trips where we expect to drive a lot, I carry a smart-phone sized Garmin Nuvi 3490LMT with car kit adapter because of the superior turn by turn navigation.

gps
Car GPS
laptop
MSI 15.6in Gaming Laptop
4.2 lbs + 1.4 lbs charger, also consider the Yoga 900 at 2.8 lbs + 0.5 lbs optional slim charger.
laptopbag
Neoprene Laptop Sleeve
mouse
Wireless Mouse
93g includes battery. Surprisingly comfortable for a small mouse.
tplink
Wi-Fi Signal Boosting Antenna
51g. Improve poor Wi-Fi signals in hotels, campgrounds…
usbkey
USB Key
harddrive
External Hard Drive (2)
0.5 lbs each. Reliable, powered through USB cable.
phone
Unlocked Blackberry Passport
phonecase
Phone magnetic flip case
hdmicable
HDMI Cable
If you want to watch movies on a TV
headphones
Headphones
Listen to music on your phone on long flights

 


 

Photography

We used to travel with crop-sensor (DX) Nikon DSLR cameras and about 6 lenses. This became very cumbersome for any type of travel due to size and weight of the lenses. For people who want more than just one lens, I highly recommend you consider the micro four thirds camera system. It has the most comprehensive set of lenses to choose from on any mirrorless camera system, and the quality of the lenses is also top notch. The lenses are less than half the size and weight of DSLR lenses. Although there are full frame sensor mirrorless cameras available, their lenses are much heavier because large sensors require large lenses, there is no getting around that fact. Comparing the image quality of a modern micro four thirds system with pro lenses vs. a modern full frame system, in good lighting it is difficult to tell the difference. All my camera equipment including body, 4 lenses, 5 batteries, cleaning kit, foam partition, charger, filters, rings, caps, capture clip, is about 5 pounds (excluding tripod).

camera
Olympus OM-D E-M1 Camera
497g with battery
2PtoUSplugadapter
Charger cable replacement
More compact replacement of the Oly battery charger cable
batteries
Extra batteries and charger for camera
sdcard
SD Card
foamdivider
Padded Camera and Lens Partition Insert
Make your pack or backpack into a camera bag inconspicuously
capture
Capture Clip with Microplate
The most important camera accessory I own.
oly9-18
Olympus 9-18mm f4.0-5.6
155g, Sharp, minimal flare, wide, can go to 35 mm equiv.
pana25
Panasonic LEICA DG SUMMILUX 25mm f1.4
200g, Sharp, bright, excellent color contrast and bokeh
oly60
Olympus 60mm f2.8 Macro
185g, One of the best macro lenses on any camera system
oly75-300
Olympus 75-300mm II f4.8-6.7
423g. Sharp long zoom. Requires good lighting conditions.
ndfilter
Haida 67mm ND 3.0 1000x Filter
The non-MC version has more natural tones but a bit more flare.
cirpl
Hoya 67mm HD Circular Polarizing Filter
Brightest CIR-PL available, second most important accessory I own.
stepping
Step-Up Rings
To fit 67mm filters to all these you need 46-52mm, 52-67mm, 58-67mm.
tripod
Giottos Carbon Fiber Tripod with Arca Ballhead
2.8 lbs. The Arca head is important if you use the Peak Design Capture Clip.

 


 

Nicknacks

toiletries
Toiletries
tp
Small roll of toilet paper
Some washrooms don’t have any, or it costs money.
ziplock
Ziplock Freezer Bags
powerstrip
Power strip
plugadapter
Universal Travel Plug Adapter
3prongplugadapter
Another plug adapter
i.e. unplug hotel lamp, plug the lamp and power strip into this.
scale
Luggage scale
So airport luggage fees don’t sneak up on you.
tape
Mini tape measure
So airport luggage fees don’t sneak up on you.
earplugs
Earplugs
mask
Scuba mask
snorkel
Dry snorkel

 


 

 

 

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Curtis' Full Time Traveler Gear Guide | Chasing Adventure

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13 Comments

  1. Yasha Langford 2 years ago

    Interesting traveler gear guide. Even though we travel quite differently, I was surprised to see how many things we carry in common.

  2. Carol Colborn 2 years ago

    Wow what a great arsenal! At 67, I cannot do this sort of thing anymore and look for comfort all the way. That is not to say I did it when I was young either! You are certainly a pro at these things!

  3. Erica 2 years ago

    This is a full-on gear guide! I love to camp out but I cannot go all out like you do. With mild scoliosis, it kind of gets in the way of a big pack.

  4. Michela 2 years ago

    Awesome travel gear list. Not sure how much weight this list of things bring to, it looks very professional. I have given up using my 55l backpack due to back health issues, but have great memories of the old backpacking days!

  5. Toccara 2 years ago

    WOW! That’s quite the list! We’re doing full-time travel right now as well, but not any camping… I’ll definitely keep this list handy for when we decide to venture out to sleeping outside under the stars! 🙂 And yes, I absolutely agree with traveling with your own GPS… it gets expensive to rent one when you rent cars and it’s great for even walking in a city to find stores and restaurants.

  6. Kate 2 years ago

    I don’t travel full-time but I do carry quite a few similar things on my regular trips. It sounds like you’ve really found what works for you and what doesn’t (in the case of the stove) Its good to have a list, re-think it when you need to and also recommend these things to other travellers. I personally love my backpack and waterproof plus a good pair of hiking shoes (not boots). Dry, comfy feet and a well designed pack will see you through most experiences!

    • Curtis Author
      Curtis 2 years ago

      It really is an ongoing process finding the gear that works best, as well as finding out what you don’t actually need to bring. When airlines keep decreasing checked-luggage weight limitations, it is beneficial to really minimize the gear. For travel, usually less is better. For example we haven’t been doing a lot of camping, so I could have reduced my pack weight by about 10 pounds!

  7. Joe Ankenbauer 2 years ago

    Great list! I use a lot of the same stuff, and some I don’t, which I intend on borrowing 😉 . I shared this on my Facebook page too!

  8. Jenna 2 years ago

    Great list. It’s definitly nice to be able to split the weight when you are with someone else! I have a thermarest as well, and love it! We’ve been wanting to get a couple of Paracord bracelets and a multi tool, as well. Both would definitly be useful!

  9. Monika 2 years ago

    Oh my god, now I now why I don’t travel full time – I wouldn’ be able to lift it up – much to heavy for me. When I have half of what you’re carrying I already consider it heavy 😀

  10. Charli 2 years ago

    You’re kitted out for serious adventure Curtis! Thanks for sharing a sneak peak into your backpack, I’m afraid mine isn’t anywhere near as organised!!

  11. Bing 1 year ago

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts on traveling as a couple.
    Regards

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  1. […] I’m only one half of this traveling duo, Curtis has created a separate list of his own. A lot of the camping gear we are traveling with is shared between us and Curtis carries all of our […]

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